DIY cheap and easy nursing cover

If you or a friend are planning on breastfeeding and may want to do so discreetly in public, a nursing cover is a great DIY project. Not too experienced with sewing? The cover is practically just hemming. I made one for a friend and spent about $6 for all the supplies to make one; to buy a cover it can cost on average, $15-$35.

Combine two fabrics for a different look

I found this nursing apron tutorial at Prudent Baby. Of all the ones I came across, this one seemed the best. Plus the step by step picture tutorial really helps!

Supplies:

  • 26″X38″ for the cover (you can make larger for older and bigger babies as well)
  • 30″x3″ for one side of the strap
  • 10″X3″ for the other side of the strap
  • Boning 14″ long
  • 2 D-rings

Recommended Fabrics:

  • Home Decor Fabrics – Heavy weight and wrinkle resistant
  • Flannel – Soft and less likely to wrinkle than cotton
  • You can also use quilting-type cotton, but keep in mind it may wrinkle easier

Want to do two different fabrics?

Keep the length measurement for both fabrics (38″), split the width measurement (26″) between your two fabrics and add 1/2 inch to both for seam allowances.You can cover the seam that joins the two fabric with ribbon or ric-rac.

Other variations:

  • Sew weights into the bottom corners t make sure corners stay down
  • Sew pockets or a rag into the corners
  • Add a ruffles or other decoration

Visit Prudent Baby for detailed instructions on how to make your nursing cover!

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Shirt refashion number 2: More ruffles and buttons

I enjoyed my first shirt refashion from a way-too-big shirt and deemed the girly ruffly bib a success, so I wanted to do another shirt refashion.

I used the same sizing technique I used HERE. But instead of shortening the sleeves at the end and re-hemming, I shortened the sleeves from where they are sewn to the shirt, that way I didn’t have to hem them!

Details of the refashioned shirt

What did I do, and how can you make one too?

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How to add ruffles and a bib to a shirt

Yesterday I posted a brief tutorial on how to make a fitted shirt from an over-sized one. This tutorial will demonstrate how refashion the shirt by making a ruffle bib front. You can make ruffles and a bib from any material; scraps from a large shirt, or scraps from a second shirt.

Supplies and Equipment:

  • Shirt or shirt scraps
  • sewing machine
  • Matching threads
  • Fabric scissors

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How to make a top from a large men’s t-shirt

I’ve been seeing a lot of cute refashion tutorials and ideas online and refashioning a t-shirt has been on my to-do list. Most of the tutorials involve some sort of ruffle or bow – which I quite like. Emma Pillsbury from Glee? LOVE her style. I figure if I can alter a cheap t-shirt it would save me money, fit me well, and I would like the style; which can sometimes be hard to find.

If you can’t find two cheap shirts to refashion, you can buy one large one and use the extra fabric to decorate. Men’s shirts at hellmart Wal-mart are $4; XXL and XXXL’s are just $5.

I bought a men’s shirt that was 4-5 sizes larger than my regular size, and planned to size it and use the extra fabric to fashion bows, ruffles, or a bib. Before I could decorate the shirt though, I had to make sure it fit me well enough that I could wear it in public. Here’s how I did it, and instructions for you to do the same.

How to make a shirt from an over-sized men’s t-shirt:

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For the ladies: alternatives to disposable menstrual products

I use to spend a lot of time on Craftster. I would go through pages and pages of sewing tutorials, decor revamps, and clothing reconstructions. One day I came across a highly popular sewing project on cotton menstrual pads. Currently there is 70+ pages of comments. When I first read the post I thought it was pretty innovative. Never in my small world had I even considered any alternatives to the norm. Everyone else I told thought it was gross, but the idea still stuck with me. I felt I couldn’t do them myself though, because I was in college and my roommates probably wouldn’t appreciate me soaking them in the sink.

After I got married I finally revisited the idea of cloth pads. I’ve been making and wearing my own cloth pads for some time now and I would never go back.

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